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Removing Your Lawn to Grow Food

Posted by David Grau on

Removing Your Lawn to Grow Food

We’ve been reading many stories about people around the country who have been removing their lawns to replace them with food gardens. We think this is a great idea. The Valley Oak Wheel Hoe can be used to cut sod, which is often the desired first step in the lawn-to-food transformation.

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Using Dynamic Mineral Accumulators to Enrich your Soil

Posted by David Grau on

Using Dynamic Mineral Accumulators to Enrich your Soil

Biodiversity of plants can help with a wide range of problems in the garden. Say you want to get more calcium into the soil so your tomatoes don’t get blossom end rot. What many farmers and gardeners might choose is to add some lime, or, perhaps on a smaller scale, eggshells. Another option is to plant a dynamic mineral accumulator such as comfrey, dandelion, or nasturtium, all of which draw calcium from the soil.

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Starting Seeds in Newspaper Pots

Posted by David Grau on

Starting Seeds in Newspaper Pots

Starting Seeds is high on the current to-do list for getting the garden going. In our last issue we visited Sawmill Creek Farms, and they had greenhouses bursting with seedlings of tomatoes, peppers, and other plants.

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Where to Get Heirloom Seeds

Posted by David Grau on

Where to Get Heirloom Seeds

This time of year finds us in a bit of a cold spell after some warm, sunny days. Gardeners with greenhouses can be starting seeds of tomatoes, eggplants, and peppers. Direct seeding of beets, kale, radishes, carrots, potatoes, chard, collards, peas (best if pre-sprouted at this date), and spinach, can be done now. Think of all those delicious, tender greens that you can harvest in late spring.

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Gardening Tips with Lee Callendar

Posted by David Grau on

Gardening Tips with Lee Callendar

We asked Lee Callender, a farmer at the sustainably-farmed GRUB CSA Farm in Chico, what activities were going on at the farm, and what types of crops they'd be growing for their community this year. He said this patch of warm weather (we've been having warm, sunny days, with cold nights), and the soil draining from (modest) rains will allow them to get the soil tilled and prepared for planting.

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